43,209 patients were included in this study. Out of those patients, 9730 (22.5%) patients had DM. Diabetes mellitus is a predictor of restenosis and late stent thrombosis (ST). Enough literature is not present on rates of early ST. Patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting-stents (DES) were analyzed with the primary outcome. The primary outcome being ST was evaluated at 30 days. Secondary outcomes included major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and mortality. On evaluation at 30 days, DM was associated with high levels of early ST (0.7% vs. 0.5%), MACE (4.1% vs. 3.5%, p = 0.004), OR 1.41 (95% confidence interval; 1.05-1.87, p = 0.02), and mortality (1.9% vs. 1.5%, p = 0.01). The amount of increased risk was not associated with treatment. DM patients under the treatment of insulin were also affected equally in regard to MACE (4.7% vs. 3.9%, p = 0.069) and mortality (1.9%, vs. 1.8%, p = 0.746). Over five-year follow-up, On National Death Index linkage, patients with DM had increased all-cause mortality (OR 1.69 CI 1.55-1.83, p = < 0.001). 

Conclusion:  

This study shows that DM was an independent predictor of early ST, MACE, and mortality at 30 days. Patients with DM undergoing PCI with DES also require additional therapeutic strategies to reduce the risk of early complications. 

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Keywords

Disease Condition,Therapeutic Modality,Coronary Artery Disease,Cardiovascular diabetes,Interventional Cardiology,Acute Coronary Syndrome,Diabetes and Heart disorders,TINC_others

Tags

Disease Condition ,Therapeutic Modality ,Coronary Artery Disease,Cardiovascular diabetes,Interventional Cardiology,Acute Coronary Syndrome,Diabetes and Heart disorders,TINC_others